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on u.s. foreign policy. i'm ralph begleiter. this week we ask, "should the u.s. give up on haiti?" to help answer this question we'll be joined by great decision participants in dallas and by our experts: ray walser, a senior policy analyst at the heritage foundation and michael shifter, president of the inter-american dialogue. thanks to both of you for being with us on great decisions. right to the top question, "should the united states give up on haiti?" ray. >> the question, i think, is posed in a moral sense, "should the u.s. do a particular, make a particular decision regarding haiti?" i don't think that is the way the question should be posed. "will the u.s. give up on haiti?" and i'm afraid that the answer may be that the u.s. over time, will tend to give up on haiti because the problems that it faces there and the reconstruction process dealing with an impoverished country with low levels of human capital and financial capital, given its tendency to move towards political division, ah, the insecurities there and the competing interests that we face around the world in a
intervention in libya diplomatic preure is growing. the u.s., britain and france warned gaddafi to hold the advance and pull back on other cities. this comes on the heels of a decision to propose a no-fly zone. gaddafi has declared a cease- fire but rebels say government forces continued their assault. >> for these rebels the no-fly zone cannot come soon enough. the resolution gives me new hope. >> there for libya has decided on an immediate cease-fire and stoppage of all operations. >> that announcement has been received with skepticism. >> the libyan people have called for international assistance. this resolution paves the way for that to be answered. colonel gaddafi's refusal to hear the repeated calls to stop violence against his own people has left us with no other choice. >> the international community will not be tricked by the libyan regime. the international community will verify strict compliance with the resolution. >> at the nato headquarters preparations were made to pave the way for operations to begin this weekend. >> we now havthe power and legal basis to stop. that is
civilians." 10 security councilmembers voted yes on the resolution. u.s., u.k., france, bosnia- herzegovina, columbia, garr bon, lebanon, nigeria, portugal, south africa. five members abstained -- russia, china, germany, brazil, india. the 10 votes was just one more than the nine needed for passage. and it did not include input from the 192-member united nations general assembly. but international support for the no-fly zone is now waning. the libyan government is alleging that coalition bombings have killed many civilians. doctors on the ground say over 100 civilians have died. military deaths not included. the 22-member arab league this week accused the u.s. and the coalition of ignoring the u.n. >> as far as we're concerned the arab league, we requested the security council to establish a no-fly zone in order to protect the civilians, in addition to safe areas for the civilians to sit in without attacks on them. >> brazil, russia, india and china, the bric nations, are all calling for an immediate cessation of the no-fly zone. u.s. defense secretary robert gates says it's gaddafi that is
, but they face a daunting task. damage running into some $30 billion u.s. the government says it has already paid compensation to half of those affected by this tsunami. in one area, the situation is better. the city's south of santiago was badly damaged. seven people were killed, and even the city hall in the church were destroyed. but when you're on, the mayor is optimistic. -- one year on. construction work is proceeding at a good pace. >> [speaking foreign language] [translation in german] >> in may year managed to convince a organizations to help with their plans -- the mayor managed to convince aid organizations. again, old materials are being reused. only cla is missing. -- clay is missing. >> the school has been providing help to this area for almost one year. >> [speaking foreign language] . >> the school also found a donor willing to provide two years' worth of health-care supplies for the center. the mayor is visiting a family that will be the first of 700 to get a proper house. i asked why things have not improved faster in this area. >> [speaking foreign language] [translation in ger
and the crash of a u.s. military jet in the east. and we talk to libya's ambassador to the united states, ali suleiman aujali, who denounced moammar qaddafi last month. >> ifill: then, margaret warner looks at rifts within the nato alliance about the libya mission. >> brown: from japan, we get the latest on the cleanup in the hard-hit city of sendai. >> it might not seem much to you, but believe me it's a huge step that you now can actually drive up at the airport's departure terminal. >> ifill: and judy woodruff interviews japan's ambassador to the u.s., ichiro fujisaki. >> brown: special correspondent steve sapienza reports from bangladesh on the struggle to meet the basic needs of an exploding population. >> dahka is one of the world's fastest growing cities and one of the poorest. with 2,000 newcomers daily the struggle to find clean water in the slums often has life threatening consequences. >> ifill: and ray suarez examines what a merger between at&t and t-mobile would mean for consumers and the wireless industry. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshou
senators gary hart and norm coleman assess president obama's decision to use u.s. military power in libya. >> ifill: then, we get a report from a japan battered by nuclear disaster and now facing elevated radiation levels in its tap water. >> lehrer: miles o'brien looks at the future for u.s. nuclear power in the wake of the japan crisis. >> ifill: ray suarez reports on how the north african nation of morocco is working to avoid becoming the next target of regional unrest. >> reporter: in washington, morocco's foreign minister gave us an overview of king mohammed's planned reforms for a country facing some of the same discontents as its neighbors. >> you know what i feel like? i feel all the time like a cat on a hot tin roof! >> lehrer: and jeffrey brown remembers legendary film star elizabeth taylor who died today at age 79. that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people des
. president obama said the u.s. and the world must be ready to act rapidly if the crisis in libya deteriorates. and he didn't rule out the use of a no-fly zone over the country. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the "newshour" tonight: we get the latest on the fierce fighting in the oil city of brega and the exodus of refugees fleeing the violence. >> woodruff: plus, we talk to libya's ambassador to the united states, ali suleiman aujali who denounced moammar qaddafi last week. >> brown: then, as states battle public sector unions, we have a newsmaker interview with afl-cio chief, richard trumka. >> woodruff: spencer michels reports on the outcry over hikes in insurance premiums in california. >> the new higher health insurance rates for individuals have sparked protests and calls for the government to step in. >> brown: and hari sreenivasan examines mexico's deadly drug wars, as president felipe calderon visits the white house. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> you can't manufacture pride, but pride builds grea
and nato enter libya. >> woodruff: plus we look at military options for the u.s. and others, including establishing a no-fly zone over the north african nation. >> warner: marcia coyle gives us the latest from the supreme court, including today's 8-1 ruling upholding the free speech rights of protesters at military funerals. >> woodruff: spencer michels reports on the controversy surrounding dozens of no fishing zones off the coast of california. >> california is establishing dozens of protected areas in the ocean, but the problem is there aren't enough game wardens to enforce the rules. >> warner: and jeffrey brown talks to libyan-born u.s. poet khaled mattawa about life in libya under qaddafi and today's uprising. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy productive life. and with the ongoing support of these institu
launches air strikes in eastern libya as it battles to regain control. two u.s. soldiers are killed in a shooting at frankfurt airport. german interior minister thomas de maiziere takes the defense portfolio in a cabinet reshuffle. captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org-- >> we begin in libya, where gaddafi has threatened to start a war if the u.s. or nato intervenes in the unrest. speaking at a political rally, gaddafi says thousands of libyans could be killed if foreign powers and to the country. member is in the suez canal are heading toward libya as the u.s. and u.n. high pressure on the regime. forces loyal to gaddafi launched air strikes on a rebel- controlled town in the east of the country. >> dozens of seriously injured rebel soldiers have been admitted to this hospital. pro-gaddafi forces have launched air strikes on the city. the libyan leader attempts to recapture lost territory in the east of the country. inhabitants are fleeing the battles. there were intense clashes further west, in the oil port held by the rebels. gaddafi is striking back fro
holman looks at the u.s. nuclear energy industry in the context of japan's current crisis. >> woodruff: then, jeffrey browç updates the conflict in libya,ç as moammar qaddafi's forces move against key rebel strongholds. >> ifill: and science correspondent miles o'brien reports on nasa's next deep space ambitions, including a journey to the planet closest to the sun. >> we'll take you to mercury and beyond. you know, the solar system is not the same place you learned about in grade school. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: in 1968, as whaling continued worldwide, the first recordings of humpback songs were relqb:qb. ( whale singing ) public reaction mud to international bans. whale populations began to recover. at pacific life, the whale symbolizes what is possible if people stop and think about the future. help protect your future with pacific life-- the power to help you succeed. ♪ ♪çç moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates founda
with u.s. ambassador to the u.n., susan rice. >> brown: then, we get the latest on the radiation containment efforts in japan as the government there raises the alert level. >> suarez: plus jeffrey kaye, in beijing, has chinese reaction to the japanese nuclear crisis. >> the nation is in the process of building 37 new nuclear pourpts, and is now reexamining safety. >> brown: mark shields and david brooks provide their weekly analysis. >> suarez: and fred de sam lazaro gets a rare look inside syria, where the government is just beginning to be challenged by protesters. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> okay, listen. somebody has got to get serious. >> i think... >> we need renewable energy. >> ...renewable energy is vital to our planet. >> you hear about alternatives, right? wind, solar, algae. >> i think it's going to work an a big scale. only, i think it's going to be affordable. >> so, where are they? >> it has to work in the real world. at chevron, we're investing millions in solar and biofuel technolo
strike on a key oil port. investigators in germany believe the fatal gun attack on two u.s. airmen in frankfurt airport was politically motivated. and and ecb interest rate hike is on the horizon as the bank frets over mounting inflation. ♪ >> france and britain say there will support a no-fly zone over libya if the situation there gets worse. the french foreign ministry says the two countries plan to do everything they can to increase pressure on moammar gaddafi. the libyan leader once more airstrikes on the rebels thursday morning. witnesses say warplanes bombed an oil port. the rebels have appealed for outside help, asking for u.n.- backed airstrikes to end the conflict. >> in the battle zone town, rebels are burying the dead. thousands turned out to join the funeral procession. there are mercenaries hired by gaddafi. they're preparing for new attacks on their town, a strategic seaport with key oil facilities, after recent air strikes, a ground attack by gaddafi's troops appears imminent. >> we're ready to face gaddafi's men. our scouts are telling us they are headed this way.
. on the "newshour" tonight: we update the military operation and get two views on what the u.s. and its allies can do to stop moammar qaddafi's forces. >> lehrer: then, judy woodruff talks to the editor of the yemen times about the growing protests in that arab nation. >> they want a life where they don't have to think of future and be equal. >> brown: paul solman has the story of the widening gap in american society between the very rich and the rest of the country. >> the top 1% is living well, and they don't get it. they don't get what is happening to this country and i feel like we're creating a third world country subculture within this country. >> lehrer: and ray suarez looks at new census numbers showing one in six americans is hispanic. >> lehrer: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> you can't manufacture pride, but pride builds great cars. and you'll find in the people at toyota, all across america. >> auto companies make huge profits. >> last year, chevron made a lot of money. >> where does it go? >> every penny and more we
>> we're not terrorist suspects. >>> coming up, u.s. muslim groups working to prevent extremism from taking hold in their communities. >> we're not terrorist suspects. we are america's brightest prospects. >>> plus, author mary karr on battling alcoholism and depression, and finding a haven in the roman catholic church. >>> welcome. i'm kim lawton, sitting in for bob abernethy. thank you for joining us. international humanitarian groups raced to help refugees fleeing the violence and chaos in libya this week. more than 200,000 people have arrived at the borders between libya and tunisia and egypt. the international red cross and red crescent societies are leading efforts to provide food, water, and sanitation, as well as medical help for the wounded. islamic relief has deployed teams of doctors and aid workers. and libya's small christian community sought help for people who have taken refuge in churches and church-run facilities. >>> religious and political leaders around the world condemned the assassination of shahbaz bhatti, the only christian to serve in pakistan's cabinet.
that the arab states will be alienated if nato led the mission. but the u.s., italy, and britain have been pushing for nato to take over the operation. william hayes said that a unified command is necessary -- william hague said that a unified command is necessary. eanwhile, rebel fors in lib's third largest city say they have killed 30 loyalists snipers. troops loyal to gaddafi have been in the hospital. there are also reports of heavy fighting in northern east. >> more and more civilians are leading the stern -- are leading the eastern town as heavy gunfire continues between troops and rebels. >> this situation is getting worse and worse. god will punish those who are responsible for this. >> on thursday, libyan state tv showed footage of damage caused by overnight air strikes. officials say that a western bombs destroyed a military base in tripoli. france has since confirmed that dozens of coalition planes were indeed in operation over the country. libyan tv also showed injured people being admitted to hospital. libyan authorities said that 18 people were killed in the strikes, soldiers
, about u.s. involvement in the north african country. >> ifill: then, marcia coyle walks us through today's supreme court arguments in a huge class action suit against wal-mart. >> woodruff: we update the nuclear crisis in japan, as the prime minister says his country is on "maximum alert." >> ifill: miles o'brien reports from the site of the world's worst nuclear disaster, the chernobyl power plant, where, decades later, radiation levels are still higher than normal. >> 25 years after the accident here, scientists are still trying to piece together its full impact. in the wake of events in japan there's new focus on their work. >> woodruff: and ray suarez interviews housing analyst robert shiller about new evidence of falling home prices in cities across the nation. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> oil companies have changed my country. >> oil companies can make a difference. >> we have the chance to build the economy. >> create jobs, keep people healthy and improve schools. >> .and our communities. >> in angola chevron h
officials doubled. the top u.s. and nato commanders in afghanistan said that washington are beginning to reduce force size in the country. steven is here with very good numbers for ejs. >> a pretty big come back with a fleet of good news revealed. the airbus company said that they returned to profit in the fourth quarter last year. forecasting higher revenue for the current year, they said they expected stronger revenue last year. the short-term version is that they have managed to move beyond big problems with several key programs. >> the boss had every reason to looked pleased as he announced full year results. the company posted and the outlook is good. >> the best way in the future is clearly cash. improved dramatically in 2010. >> the aircraft maker, airbus, demonstrates the lot -- the lion's share. they want to spend more on acquisitions. luckily we are in the situation where airbus is expanding. business is developing nicely while at the same time we see growth possible in other areas. in security, defense electronics, and services. we want to go -- growth through internal inve
, and what u.s., nato and allied roles will be, we talked to senators john mccain and jack reed. >> there are times where the greatest nation in the world and the strong eh nation in the world has to act alone, that is not the preference, and the preference is to build coalitions as we have most of the times in the past. i think that president obama may be unintentionally or intentionally conveying the impression that we can never act alone. i don't think that is appropriate, given possible scenarios. >> as we have seen, this trance formative effect in egypt and tunisia, i can't we want to encourage that but we want to recognize it is best done through a coalition, it is best done by using the particularly unique capabilities of the united states, but not committing our forces to long-term engagements. >> and david ignatius of the washington post, david ignatius, doyle mcmanus and julianna goldman. >> it is exhilarating seeing for people calling for change and sweeping away governments and yet where it is going, what the risks are for the united states, nobody knows, and i think
says it will be hosting a summit in london next week. progress on the u.s. mandate intervention in libya. the u.s. military said there is no indication that coalition air strikes resulted in any civilian casualties. wednesday night, sites again or targeted in the capital of tripoli. bobby gaddafi -- gaddafi's tanks in israel were hit. schelling's have resumed. >> a propaganda war is also being waged in libya. brandishing, a presenter on libyan state television pledged to give his last breath for libyan leader gaddafi. state television also broadcast images of gaddafi's supporters staging demonstrations and gaddafi himself making a brief public appearance for the first time in days. speaking from his compound, gaddafi pledged victo, denouncinghat he called the unjustified aggression of crusader nations. although the united nations- backed strike had forced his troops to retreat, battles are still waiting on the ground. rebels and regime forces are still fighting for control in eastern libya, where thehave been engaged in a standoff for days. the u.s. president says intervention w
radiation in the vicinity posed no immediate danger. but she added japan was considering asking the u.s. military for assistance. the nuclear emergency has forced the evacuation of more than 400,000 people. those in the affected area lineup for hours for drinking water, food, and other essential goods. most of remained, in the face of enormous hardship and confusing news -- confusing news. now some are growing anxious. >> i am extremely uneasy. information is so complex, and i cannot make any decisions by myself. i am really confused. >> emergency officials are checking people at shelters who fled the affected area for higher levels of radiation. but levels so far are of little concern, as is limited radioactivity directed in drinking water in the fukushima area. >> the japanese emperor has expressed his deep concern about the nuclear crisis. in a rare address to the nation, he called on the japanese people to reach out and help each other in this time of national suffering. in the disaster areas in the country's northeast, hundreds of thousands of people are still facing shortages of f
fire earlier in the day. also today the u.s. navy moved some of its ships to the western side of japan away from the drift of radiation. and the rising risk of exposure touched off new fears in people still shaken by the quake and tsunami. alex thomson reports from the town of ofunato, up the coast from sendai. >> reporter: every day across the quake zone the cues for food, water and petrol are getting longer and longer. >> we just want to stay away. >> reporter: now fears over radiation mean hurried plans from some to leave town. >> let's make a base here. >> reporter: today our business lay to the north. they've just managed to blast away in, bull dozing away the tsunami's wake. a place utterly surrendered to the tsunami. japan's rising sun flag in tatters on this cold sunless day. a force which would pulverize the heavy lift digger somehow leaves intact the sign pointing people to the tsunami shelter. i don't doubt that it was a place of refuge for many during those terrifying moments last friday afternoon. if they survived they can look down now on this industrial sector of their t
. and the entire pacific, including the west coast of the u.s., was put on alert. good evening. i'm jim lehrer. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the newshour tonight, we have video of the disaster, and talk to three people in tokyo for firsthand accounts of what they experienced and how the nation responded. >> lehrer: and we get an early assessment of how well japan was prepared for the dual hit of the earthquake and the tsunami. >> woodruff: then, we excerpt president obama's remarks about the federal budget stalemate and the uprising in libya at a white house news conference. >> we are tightening the noose on qaddafi, seymour and more isolated internationally both through sanctions as well as an arms embargo. >> lehrer: and mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> okay, listen. somebody has got to get serious. >> i think... >> we need renewable energy. >> ...renewable energy is vital to our planet. >> you hear about alternatives, right? wind, solar, algae. >> i think it's
, that will make them technologically power in 20 years. they are still behind the u.s. they have to put up a stealth fighter, put a man into space, that's a prodigious effort on their part. >> rose: is the faceoff between china and the united states going to come primarily in the pacific. is that where the struggle will be? >> i don't think there will be a faceoff in a sense of a a conflict. >> rose: i don't mean a military conflict. but i mean a struggle for... >> a strul for influence, yes. i think it will be subdued because the chinese need the u.s. chinese need u.s. markets, need u.s. technology and needs to have students go to the u.s. and study u.s. ways and then start doing business so that they can improve and it's going to take them ten, 20, 30 years. all that information and all that technological capabilities will be cut off from them. so it will be maintained at a level which allows them to still top the u.s. >> rose: you knew deng xiaoping well. what would he be doing today? would he be any different than hu jintao? >> i cannot say because deng xiaoping was of a different gene
makers. >> in man who shot two u.s. servicemen was acting alone in frankfurt. captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org-- >> muammar gaddafi's forces are fighting rebels on several fronts. in the west security forces launched an offensive to retake one town. in tripoli, protesters took to the streets calling for the end of muammar gaddafi's rule. there have been no reports of injuries. heavily armed rebels clashed with muammar gaddafi's fors elsewhere. the head of the rebel council says the fighting will not stop until the opposition liberates the entire country. the rebels are preparing to march on tripoli. >> rebels under fire from khadafi = = -- gaddafi loyalists. this man screams he wants to murder his own people. this is the site of a key oil terminal. rebels fired a sustained brian shaw of artillery in an attempt to overrun a military base. fighting was also reported 200 kilometers to the east. loyalist forces are taking a position outside one city. rebels are manning anti-aircraft guns around the clock. >> we have had enough. we want progress and not a corru
to their country. >> it could take up to five days. >> meanwhile in afghanistan, u.s. secretary of defense robert gates has apologized to president hamid karzai for the accidental deaths of children last week, six days after u.s. helicopter crews killed nine boys mistaken for taliban fighters. it's also discussed the future of the u.s. military in afghanistan, expected to be withdrawn by the end of 2014. a small contingent will remain to help train afghan security forces. the unrest going on in africa and the middle east is causing chaos with oil prices. >> causing major worries about economic growth. oil prices in london and new york spiking higher on monday on concerns over wider supply disruptions in the middle east and north africa. the recent sharp spike in prices and worries over what may come has prompted the unid states to continue tapping its emergency oil reserves. >> as oil prices soar, industrial countries around the world are deciding whether they should tap into their reserves. the u.s. consumes more than 19 million barrels of oil every day, more than any other country. washington i
a blast car radiation levels rose for a time. at the u.s. is sending more specialists to help al with the threat. in the country's -- in the country, the northeast humanitarian crisis -- the government has appealed for calm as people in tokyo began to flee the city or stock up on the essential supplies. >> in japan, the un's the nuclear energy agency says the containment wall at one of the reactors at the fukushima power plant may have been breached after an explosion on monday. radiation levels rose after a fire and separate reactor blast. most of the people within 30 kilometers have been evacuated. those remaining are being urged to stay indoors. above normal radiation levels have been measured in tokyo, 250 kilometers to the south. >> it tuesday's fire in reactor no. 4 and damage from explosions at the other reactor blocks pose a potentially disastrous situation. reports say pull for spent fuel rods in reactor no. 4 may have overheated and cannot be refueled -- cannot be refilled with water. workers are making a desperate attempt to pour water into the partially damaged roof u
demanding he stop killing. nato is still wrangling or who should run the campaign after the u.s. steps back. president obama and france's nicholas sarkozy have a and currently come to an agreement over how france should participate in the mission, but no word yet on when france will be taking over. one thing that has been agreed upon is that the arms embargo must be enforced. >> nato has committed to enforcing the arms embargo by air and by sea. hips and aircraft will patrol the air and coastal waters in an attempt to stem the mercenaries joining the gaddafi regime. rebels are hoping this will even the playing field against the dictator superior military might. but german foreign minister is calling for yet more wide reaching sanctions. >> we are working for an all out oil and gas embargo. it cannot be that at the same time military air strikes are being flown, the possibility of contious gas and oil deals with the gaddafi rajeev have not been completely cut rolled out. -- gaddafi regime have not been completely ruled out. >> this video footage shows a harbor aimed at taking out in 80 days.
the population. that is the minimalist position. the u.s. as a separate -- i don't know if they used the word "objective," but it is clear that he has to go. our national interest is that he go, because as evan said, if he doesn't, we will have problems at home, we will have lost. the problem is that obama has hitched himself to the un, this multilateralism, so that we are constrained to go for what the u.n. and the international community wants, which is much, much less than what the u.s. wants and needs. >> what if gaddafi doesn't go? peggy noonan, writing in "the wall street journal" this week, "what are we for? two of the fort was a glow wjla.co -- who are we 4?" >> lets it get back to the objective of getting rid of gaddafi. setting out to kill him or defeat them -- you could say we have an axis of evil in the countries. you didn't go-- to war against korea because of the axis of evil. or when reagan talks about the evil empire, clearly an enemy. we did not go to war -- >> but this is different. if you go to kill the king, you have to kill the king. if you leave them in place, what you h
. the international community is undecided as to how to respond, but the u.s. says it is not ruling out the possibility of military intervention. >> washington has said it will move planes and warships closer to libya. our washington correspondent will tell us with that mission will entail. >> there are some midsize ships in the area. they're still discussing the matter. it seems unlikely any military action will be taken. what the u.s. wants to avoid is they intervene militarily because of oil. these military ships will assess some human -- humanitarian actions. they're not saying so openly at the moment because they want to foremost, build up pressure on gunboat diplomacy. >> there has been talk about imposing a no-fly zone. what is the latest on that? >> it is not off the table. privately, u.s. officials are saying it would be complicated and military members are saying it would involve taking out anti-aircraft installations in libya which in other words, means bombing. on top of that, the u.s. would do that within the framework of nato, who would need the backing of the un and count
. >> ifill: off shore the aircraft carrier u.s.s. ronald reagan moved farther out to sea after thre of its helicopters flew into a low- level radiation plume 60 miles from the coast. but even without the radiation worries, there are still growing concerns over shortages of water, food, and power. closer to the quake's epicenter, grocery stores remained shut. >> family and friends are all gathered together in one house. now we're running out of food so i'm starting to worry. >> ifill: there were long orderly lines to red cross water tankers to dispense drinking water while lines for gasoline stretched city blocks. the stations that still had supplies were limiting drivers to the equivalent of $2 worth of fuel. financial markets were rocked as well by a broad sell-off today amid fears of economic fallout. the widespread power shortage have halted production at toyota plants and other factories around the country. meanwhile, the japanese government has sent 100,000 troops to lead the relief effort. and at the government's request the u.s. sent two 75- person urban search-and-rescue teams each
street was battered today by waves of economic worries. disappointing data from china and the u.s. and new fears about europe's debt crisis fed the sell-off. the dow jones industrial average lost 228 points to close at 11,984-- its biggest drop since last august. the nasdaq fell 50 points to close at 2,701. forces loyal to libyan leader moammar qaddafi blasted a key oil port with tanks and warplanes today and claimed they'd recaptured it. the target was the city of ras lanouf, which rebel fighters had seized a week ago. we have a report from lindsey hilsum of "independent television news." >> reporter: the skies were clear for colonel qaddafi's fighter jets today. the bombs fall percely close to the oil refinery. earlier, one landed within the perimeter fence. we drive past. it's a storage-- if the storage tanks of oil and gas were hit, the areas for miles around would be devastated. we stop, and another falls. that's the second bmb we've seen falling in the last half hour. the fighting is heavy. i can hear the thud of artillery it seems colonel qaddafi's force are determined. may
you a rule of thumb, every 10 dollars on oil prices reduces growth in the u.s. by about two/10 to 3/10 of a percent so right now 10, 15 dollars in the last couple of months we're looking at growth maybe instead of 3.2 or 3.3, only 3%. but if it goes to 150, say, that's a whole different story or even higher. then i think we have reason to worry. >> so summing up, is it too soon to call it a turning point. how would you characterize it. >> i would say certainly the job situation is a turning point. i think we have seen this recovery now spread to the jobs market. there is this sort of cloud, thunder cloud on the horizon but if all goes well, and in fact some of the turmoil in the middle east sort of settles down, oil prices will come down and that particular source of risk, if you will, to the u.s. economy will dissipate. >> and lisa lynch what do you see, how would you characterize it and how many, if you get about 200,000 jobs this month, how many do we need and how long do we need to sustain it before you say okay, now it's real. >> so 200,000 jobs a month, if we continue to keep
. >> reporter: but several witnesses testified that the u.s. muslim community is not doing enough to counterradic counterradicalism in its midst. family members described who you two american muslims were recruited by extremisextremists. the president said his faith is being hijacked by what he called a political movement promoting radicalization. >> we have a problem, where is that? it's a minority but there's an ideology that exifs in some masks, not all, not a majority, but some, and it's a significant number. >> reporter: religious groups mobilized throughout the hearing. in new york, interfaith supporters joined thousanded s muslims. a smaller counterrally alleged that muslims are linked to terrorism. and some in the faith community said congress should be looking into this. >> name another religion where there's an international coordinated effort today where there could be an imam in yemen talking to a member of our mill tale in texas to carry out an attack on troops or young people recruited. it's not happening. >> reporter: u.s. islamic advocacy groups accuseongss of unf
, the head of the u.s. central command, marine general james mattis, said enforcing it would be challenging. >> you would have to remove air defense capability in order to establish a no-fly zone. no illusions here, it would be a military operation. it wouldn't just be telling people not to fly airplanes. >> woodruff: the idea of imposing curbs on libyan air space drew a sharply negative response today in moscow. the russian foreign minister said any such action would be "a serious mistake" unless the u.n. approves it first. >> brown: still to come on the newshour, moving towards a deal on spending cuts; assessing public versus private sector pay; and today's supreme court rulings. but first, the other news of the day. here's hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: the president of yemen is now accusing the u.s. of instigating protests against his rule. president ali abdullah saleh has been a u.s. ally, but he charged today the white house is directing the unrest from an operations room in israel. a u.s. state department spokesman denied that charge. meanwhile, hundreds of thousands of people sta
think the one message-- and it's not the u.s., it's anyone who could speak to the syrians-- is to say the threshold not to be crossed is the use of indiscriminate violence against peaceful protesters. that's the threshold. we can be very disappointed about the lack of reform and that's a judgment the syrian people are going to have to make but in terms of the use of force against peaceful protesters, that's when i speak about kinsy and that i think should be the message. >> i agree. >> simon: we conclude with a conversation charlie taped recently with linda wells, the editor in chief of "allure" magazine. >> to do the magazine in the last 20 years is better than if we picked any other time-- not that we could have-- if we pick any other time in the past 20 years. more has chked now in the past 20 years, in terms of products, attitudes, in terms of the visual name of our culture and in terms of the acceptance of beauty and in terms of all the controversy attached to it-- plastic surgery and doing too much and anorexia and aging. there are all these subjects that are really vital. so th
for al qaeda but also a quiet u.s. ally in the fight against terrorism. now, its ruler of more than 30 years is under pressure from demonstrators, his generals, and diplomats to step aside. for more, we turn to christopher boucek, an associate in the middle east program of the carnegie endowment for international peace, and a frequent visitor to yemen. do these defections, regular resignation represent a real turning point in the strugate of the opposition against the president of yemen. >> a week ago i would have said no but i think there's a cumulative effect. what we're seeing today with the large number of foreign ambassadors that have resigned there's a cumulative effect. it shows decreasing support for the president and the regime. >> suarez: at the same time as major general resigned and took his armored division to key sights in the capital, other high-ranking generals declared their allegiance to the president. does this bring yemen one step closer to civil war? >> i think there's always been a real concern thatiolence could escalate. you'd have an unintended escalation of vio
be a solution, a fair solution on the palestinian issue. i think... with the u.s. saying whether it was going to have this hijacked or not, whether it's hijacked or not, one thing that is, i think, irreversible is that there is going to be a free press in all these countries. that is irreversible. and that... whatever the government says, that free press is going to demand a better implementation of agreement between israel and the arab countries. i understand that israel is buying egyptian guards cheaper than the egyptian consumer and 40% cheaper than the jordanians. i don't think the egyptians would like to... >> rose: well, there have also been stories that people in gaza were paying a lot more for things that came from israel than the people of israel were paying for them. >> well, that's inside israel, inside the occupation. but the egyptians are going to say how come we sell our goods to a neighbor-- no matter how friendly they are-- than to another neighbor, jordan, or to ourselves. that's very difficult to justify. >> would you speculate that it's more likely that freely-elected leade
35-year-old this 35-year-old who came to the u.s. a decade ago and another man, 37, who arrived when he was in middle school tried to make their own kind of sense broadcasting to iran in farci as part of the u.s.-government funded persian news network. >> frankly we did something new i think. 99.9.9% of the news that comes out, you know, there's nothing funny. it's always something horrible. and reporting the news has been repetitive. so we turn it into how we would talk about it as if we're talking to you right now or sitting at a bar. >> brown: indeed. a reference to the iranian government's repeated attempts to jam foreign sat fight programming and websites often takes the "are you kidding me" approach. as when supreme leader ayatollah khamenei says that the uprising was a reprieve of the revolution. >> today in egypt the echo of your voice is heard. >> brown: and the response? >> who said that? who told you? where have you heard it. >> brown: the point, he says, is that leaders can and should be questioned. >> they want people to believe that this is not their voice. this is the
the u.s intervene in libya? we join that debate with two people who've wrestled with similar questions as director of policy planning at the state department. richard haass held that position in the george w. bush administration. he's now presidentf the council onorei relations. his latest book is, "war of necessity, war of choice: a memoir of two iraq wars." anne-marie slaughter worked in the obama administration state department until earlier this year. she's now professor of politics and international affairs at princeton university. anne-marie slaughter, i'll start with you. we've heard some of those fighting against qaddafi calling for outside help, specifically a no-fly zone. what's the chief argument for helping them >> the strongest argument for helping them is stwra t.j. i can which is that we've finally seen a major shift in the theirty of the entire middle east from anti-americanism and anti-israel and focused, really, outside to an indigenous demand for democratic government, for accountable government, for government that provides decent services by the young people of the
which recognized the independence of u.s.a. and also in morocco you signed, america, the first treaty, trade, and also protection against piracy. and we've done a good job since the beginning. but now i think that u.s.a. tried to encourage the best evolution possible in the arab world because the arab world is not monolithic in terms of political regimes. and the monarchies like in morocco and monarchy in gulf countries, republics, military dictators and we cannot put all the country in the same baskets and morocco started at the beginning immediately after gaining independence. we fight against the party, we established the first constitution in 1962 and since this time, we've amended this constitution four times. and i think that also in morocco thanks to the vigors of the society and the freedom of press and protests and manifestation we all the time work on our... walk on our two legs-- political leg and also social and economic leg. and maybe the error was made when during the last decade some countries want security through economy without trying to convince others that it's imp
to his people. i also have stated that it is u.s. policy that qaddafi needs to go go. and we've got a wide range of tools in our military efforts to support that policy. we were very rapid in initiating unilateral sanctions and then helping to mobilize international sanctions against the qaddafi regime. >> rose: joining me now from the eastern city of tobruk is richard engel, chief foreign correspondent for nbc news. >> it's a pleasure, charlie. >> rose: what's your sense of this war? what factors on the ground influence the way you see it? >> the rebels here obviously are very excited that they finally have international support, particularly american support they feel that they have suddenly been recognized by the greatest military in the world, the u.s. military, and that army and air strikes and naval strikes will carry them to tripoli. i'm not sure if that's what the intended message is from the united states but it's how it's been perceived here and the rebel strategy seems to be allow the air strikes to continue to decimate qaddafi's army and they can do this very slow march
condemned a group of u.s. soldiers charged in the murders of three afghan civilians. it marked the first time karzai publicly addressed the case since graphic photos of the troops posing with dead afghans were published in "der spiegel" and "rolling stone magazine." karzai said the soldiers took drugs and, hey lled our youth for entertainment. they killed our elders for entertainment." the first of the five soldiers to be court-martialed pleaded guilty to murder last week. he was sentenced to 24 years in prison. fighters who support the internationally recognized leader of ivory coast seized control of the capital city today. the opposition forces staged a dramatic advance on yamoussoukro from all sides this week, before capturing it tonight. the commercial capital abidjan is likely the next battleground. president laurent gbagbo has refused totep down, despite losing to allasane outtara last fall. the food and drug administration convened a panel today to examine whether food dyes cause hyperactivity in children. the agency has long rejected any clear link. but a new report said the dye
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